All For A Story

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Title: All For A Story
Author: Allison Pittman
Published: October 1, 2013
Publisher: Tyndale House
Pages: 354

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Monica Brisbane loves being a modem girl in the Roaring Twenties. Her job writing a gossip column takes her to all the local speakeasies in Washington D. C. and she loves dancing the night away scoping put new stories for her column. However, her future takes an uncertain turn when the owner of Capitol Chatter passes away, leaving Monica what will happen to her job and her beloved lifestyle.

Max Moore might hold the position of editor-in-chief for evangelist Aimee Semple McPherson’s paper, the Bridal Call, but it’s clear that Aimee calls all the shots. So when Max finds out that his great uncle has passed away and left him all his earthly possessions, Max resigns and moves to Washington D.C. to hopefully become a real editor-in-chief. He tries to clean up the scandalous paper and infuse it with his own values, but he’s soon bumping heads with the equally determined Monica Brisbane.

With Max’s guidance Monica goes on her most challenging assignment yet, infiltrating and reporting on the Anti-Flirt Society. Reluctant at first, Monica meets and mi goes with the girls but soon begins to doubt the wisdom of her flirtatious ways and when romance starts to blossom between her and Max, Monica must choose between the lifestyle the club chooses or the lifestyle she lived for so long.

Will Monica ever change her party and flirtatious lifestyle or will she continue down the path of destruction? Will Max trade everything for Monica or will he be able to convince Monica that there is a life without speakeasies and flirting? Will Max be able to turn the Capitol Chatter into a respectable paper or will he lose the fight against immorality? Can Monica change her ways or is she forever a party girl?
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Due to my opinion of Allison Pittman’s last novel, I wasn’t expecting much out of this book. I fully expected to struggle through this one like the last and hate it at the end. I didn’t. I actually enjoyed this one. Though my opinion of the enigmatic Aimee Semple McPherson hasn’t budged an inch, I did enjoy the plot line for this and how radically different it was from the previous book in this series. I think Allison Pittman did a much better job with this book than the last.

This book had a romance! And a fairly good one at that. The character of Monica is uniquely lovable from the get-go and Max’s serious nature didn’t seem like it would mesh with Monica’s but somehow the author managed to craft a romance that was sweet and lovable. Though it wasn’t the best romance I’ve ever read, it was definitely welcomed compared to the completely confusing disaster of a semi-romance in the last book.

Usually I don’t love women crusaders or women evangelist ever in a story, but I loved Alice Reighly and her Anti-Flirt campaign, probably because even though some of her rules are a bit stiff and outrageous, the general idea is one I follow everyday and never thought twice about it. It basically encourages women to not encourage the bad behavior of men by flirting back or making light of it. I think the idea is one every woman should consider to follow.

The story of this one was more engaging and felt less like I was watching a horrible tragedy happen right before my eyes, thankfully in that story the accident never happened but it still left a sour mark for me. In this story, there were moments of disappointment or like it might go down the disastrous path again but it pulled out of those situations and was actually a pretty nice story. I would’ve liked to have seen more of a transformation in Monica but part of me felt like this was a different look at how some people come to Christ.

This author gave me a much better story with this or and made me very glad that I didn’t throw out all hope with the last book. Though I still don’ love the radical type style that this author chooses, I think I’m becoming more accustomed to it and haven’t given up hope yet of finding an amazing book by her. This book was good but I don’t recommend it for just anyone.

Overall, I enjoyed this book a lot more than the previous book by her but I’ still not sold on her writing just yet. This book is perfect for fans of Allison Pittman or fans of the Roaring Twenties. Keep this book away from your children this one is definitely not recommended for anyone other than adults. I give this book a four out of five.

*I received a complimentary copy of this book in exchange for this review. All opinions expressed are my own.*

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All For A Song

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Title: All For A Song
Author: Allison Pittman
Publisher: Tyndale House
Published: February 1, 2013
Pages: 360

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Dorothy Lynn Dunbar has everything any girl could ever want: a family that loves her, a great church, a tight-knit community, and a handsome fiancé that’s the pastor to her church. Spending time in the woods lost in her music, lifting her heart and voice in worship to God with her brother’s guitar, should make her life complete but she longs for more.

Spending a week in St. Louis looking for a wedding dress with her sister, gives her more when she discovers Aimee Semple McPherson’s crusade team. Given the chance to sing on stage for this powerful woman, Dorothy begins to see how dangerous stardom can be. But she reluctantly agrees to follow Aimee and her troupe to Los Angeles to find her brother and herself.

As she traverses the good and bad side of the ’20s she’s forced to consider what she wants out of life. With her engagement on the rocks because of her choices and temptation like no other rears its ugly head and innocent Dorothy must use every power in her to resist. Dorothy and her naïveté get her into a lot of trouble and temptation and it doesn’t seem like she’s strong enough to get herself out.

Will Dorothy resist temptation and sin or will she give in and ruin her life for good? How will Dorothy decide what she truly desires in life? What will Dorothy choose? Her sweet innocent life back home or a wild new world out in California? Can Dorothy win back her fiancé or did she lose him forever?
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Being me, I picked this book solely for cover and era. I’ve been a fan of the “Roaring ’20s” for a while and wanted to read this one solely for that. Unfortunately, this time my gamble didn’t pay out. This book is, for lack of a better word, boring. There was no real excitement and the storyline was actually kind of predictable. I don’t think this is the best representative of the 1920s and the views of that time.

This book was a mess. It felt disjointed and bipolar. The emotions shot all across the map, making the reader wonder what emotion we’re going to encounter next. And the fact that part of the book was from the 19 year old Dorothy and the 107 year old Dorothy really made the story jump around and though it was a good concept, it wasn’t executed very well.

One factor I really didn’t like was Aimee Semple McPherson. It was the part that the author liked the most and her admiration for the woman comes through her after note but it doesn’t resonate throughout the book. I didn’t agree with the doctrine in this book nor did I like the Aimee Semple McPherson I was shown. My view of her after reading this book was that she was haughty and in the business of saving souls just for the fame and fortune that comes with being a female evangelist. I really don’t think the author portrayed this woman, whom she really admires, in a very appealing light.

I really didn’t care much for any of the characters, except for the minor characters that only had a few lines. I felt that the heroine left her faith when she left her hometown and particularly when she needed it most, I felt that her fiancé was foolish and slightly controlling, the guy she turns to and trusts is the epitome of slimy and womanizer and not at all what a Christian should be not to mention I got the impression he was just being nice to her to make her his conquest, Aimee came off as haughty and slightly bitter, and Dorothy’s sister was overbearing. None of them were very like able and I felt greatly disappointed in that.

I didn’t like this book from Allison Pittman. I don’t think I’ve read anything from this author before and because I like to give people a second chance I do intend to read more from this author but with more of a caution. I don’t know for sure, but if I had to guess I would say that this book isn’t a proper representation of her ability. I don’t recommend this book and I can’t really recommend this author, at least not yet.

Overall, I didn’t like this book at all and I don’t really recommend this one. Some of you might like this book more than other and me, but read at your own caution. This book is best for adults only. I give this book a two out of five.

*I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for this review. All opinions expressed are my own.*